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Sunday, January 26, 2014

TVAMD Episode 208: The New Year!


Sean, Brooks and Andrew bring in 2014 talking about Quentin Tarantino's Hateful 8, Kick-Ass 2, the new HBO series True Detective, the new series of Sherlock, Community, Arrested Development, Breaking Bad, and new developments in Agents of SHIELD. They also fear for the future of the internet in the absence of net neutrality.


Saturday, January 25, 2014

TVAMD Episode 205: TVAMD Unplugged 2!


Sean, Brooks, Greg and Andrew continue their unprecedented series of face to face discussions. Tonight they discuss their box office predictions, do a little dream analysis and bitch about the Walking Dead some more.


Sunday, January 19, 2014

TVAMD Episode 203!


Sean, Brooks, Greg, Andrew and Gary finish their anniversary discussion without Lynn by coming up with the most sexist topics they can think of. From "men's rights" groups to a proposal pushing for government-provided girlfriends, they pretty much cover as broad a range of ridiculously reprehensible topics as you can imagine.

Then they wrap it up by talking about the Walking Dead. After 200 episodes of TVAMD, not a thing has changed.


Sunday, January 12, 2014

TVAMD Episode 204: TVAMD Unplugged!


Sean, Brooks, Greg, and Andrew sit down for the first of an unprecedented series of face to face discussions. For the first time ever, the boys are all sitting down at the same table in these live, unedited recordings! In this session, they make predictions about upcoming movies like the new Captain America, the 300 sequel, Godzilla, Robocop, and the Guardians of the Galaxy. They also discuss the Hobbit sequel and Doctor Who, teasing more involved discussions to follow in future episodes.


Saturday, January 11, 2014

TVAMD Episode 202!


Sean, Brooks, Greg, Andrew, Gary and Lynn bring in the new year by talking about pop culture icons like Star Wars, Star Trek, Indiana Jones, Friday the 13th and Nightmare on Elm Street. What makes an icon? And in a world of ever-expanding media and technology, is it possible for a generation to be defined by a single movie anymore? And if not, could that mean the end of popular culture?